Contempt

When one spouse is considered contemptuous, it is because they ignore a responsibility given to them in the divorce decree or Georgia settlement agreement. It is only considered contempt if one party was ordered to do something by the court, was able to do such an action, and still failed to do it. The most touchy part of this, due to being the most difficult to prove, is whether the party was able to complete the responsibility.

Contempt is most often found in instances relating to child support and visitation. In such cases the Court will likely require repayment of child support or re-establishment of visitation (barring a compelling reason otherwise). However, contempt can also apply to any provision Court’s Order, Consent Order, or Final Judgment and Decree. Just a few example of other instances in which contempt can be applied include alimony, exchange of property, payment of debts, or procurement of life insurance.